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Karlsruhe: Twin towns

Die Partnerstadt Temeswar - "Klein Wien" an der Bega

Entstehung der Partner­schaft

Auf Initiative des ehemaligen Stadtrats Günther Rüssel wurde nach dem politi­schen Umbruch in Rumänien eine Städte­freund­schaft mit Temes­war/Ti­mi­soa­ra/Te­mesch­burg angeregt. Die Kontakte wurden auf einer breiten Basis gelebt, so dass im Jahr 1997 die Umwandlung in eine Städte­part­ner­schaft erfolgte.

Today Temeswar, a city with over 330,000 inhabi­tants and lying close to the Hungarian border, is the third largest metro­po­li­tan area of Romania. The town on the Bega has enjoyed friendly relations with Karlsruhe since September 1992 and in November 1997 the two cities officially became twinned-towns. It was in the aftermath of the Romanian revolution of 1989 that the first links were forged between the two cities by charity organi­sa­ti­ons. There followed many and varied deliveries of emergency aid and supplies from the fan-shaped city to Romania. In particular, technical equipment and medical apparatus including medicines were sent but also simple, everyday items such as bed linen and irons were greatly welcomed. And these played a part in helping to alleviate the emergency situation prevailing in Timosoa­ra's hospitals, schools and homes at that time.

The first visit made by a delegation of the Karlsruhe City Council was followed by countless return visits. The autumn of 1992 saw fifty pupils of the Nikolaus Lenau Lyceum in Temeswar enjoying a visit to the Rüppurr Max Planck Grammar School. In 1993 the first nation-wide group of Temeswar citizens were received in Karlsruhe. Students came, folklore and folk dancing groups were there, orchestras, ballet companies and theatre ensembles provided the musical and artistic slant; Romanian sporting perso­na­li­ties ran in the Red Cross marathon and also university vice-chancel­lors became involved in the exchange programme. As a result of an idea inspired by the two cities, the German-Romanian Trade and Commerce Office was opened in the Karlsruhe Town Hall at the end of 1997. Its main purpose was to work to set up contacts between German and Romanian enter­pri­ses and businesses. Today we have close and cordial connec­ti­ons in a wide variety of fields, which are being permanently nurtured and promoted parti­cu­larly by the Karlsruhe - Temesch­burg group of friends.

Temeswar can look back on a chequered history. The capital city of Banat first appeared on official documents in 1177 and was named "Demen­si­en­sis Castrum." As a result of its destruc­tion by the Tartars in 1241, the Hungarian king, Bela IV, decreed that German settlers should move into this region. This came to pass and the city was raised from its ashes. Disaster, however, struck again in 1443 when the town was once more annihil­ated, this time by an earthquake. Rebuilding began and the town of Temeswar was brought back to life only to be conquered by the Turks in 1552. It was not until 1716 that it was finally won back by the Austrian army under the leadership of Prince Eugene.

The town had suffered enormously at the hands of war and the reper­cus­si­ons thereof. Nevert­he­less it was yet again rebuilt. Since then the style of Austrian baroque has coloured the appearance and atmosphere of Temeswar. And for that reason the town was chris­te­ned "Little Vienna" in the days preceding the First World War. The cathedral, the town hall and many elegant palaces dating from the 18th century have all remained well preserved up until the present. Their presence creates the atmosphere one would expect of a typical provincial capital of the former Danube monarchy. In the wake of the First World War the area of Banat was separated from Hungary and since that time Temeswar has belonged to Romania. Traces of the reper­cus­si­ons of the Ceausescu dicta­tor­ship, a regime which threw Romania into economic ruin and turned its people into a nation of hungry, cold and sick souls, can still be seen today. But indeed it was from Temeswar that the impetus came in 1989 to overthrow the destruc­tive regime. Following the storming of the city's party buildings by the people in the December of that year, the revolution gained momentum and swept through the entire country. A few days later an end had been put to the rule of Ceausescu.

A wealth of natio­na­li­ties, encom­pas­sing a total of 40 religions, makes up the colourful mosaic shaping the life and lifestyles of modern-day Temeswar. These include the descen­dants of the Hungarians and Germans who constitute the largest minorities together with the Serbs, the Romany and Bulgarians. Cultural life flourishes against such a varied and inter­na­tio­nal backcloth. Temeswar boasts a National Theatre, is home to the Romanian opera, it has both a German and a Hungarian National Theatre and also a puppet theatre and the city is most proud of its National Philhar­mo­nic Orchestra. Similarly in the field of education, the city and its surroun­ding area have a great deal to offer. There is a total of seven higher education establis­h­ments attended by more than 20,000 students. The city of Temeswar also plays a signi­fi­cant role when it comes to the politics and economy of the country. In addition, the city forms an important transport and commu­ni­ca­tion crossroads; and it also enjoys the facilities and services of an inter­na­tio­nal airport.

 

Domplatz

Domplatz


Türme der Orthodoxen Mitropolitenkathedrale

Türme der Orthodoxen Mitropolitenkathedrale


Serbisch-orthodoxes Bischofspalais

Serbisch-orthodoxes Bischofspalais


Häuser am Domplatz

Häuser am Domplatz


Dom mit Dreifaltigkeitssäule

Dom mit Dreifaltigkeitssäule


Barockschloss und altes Geschäftshaus

Barockschloss und altes Geschäftshaus


Romulus und Remus Säule und Wohnhäuser bei der Kathedrale

Romulus und Remus Säule und Wohnhäuser bei der Kathedrale


Orthodoxe Mitropolitenkathedrale

Orthodoxe Mitropolitenkathedrale



Llyod Palais, Prunkstück am Siegesplatz (hist. Postkarte)

Llyod Palais, Prunkstück am Siegesplatz (hist. Postkarte)


Rathaus

Rathaus


 

Daten und Fakten zu Temeswar

Location: largest city in western Romania, capital city of the gover­n­men­tal district of Timis and the country's third-largest city. Surface Area: 130 square kilometres. Inhabi­tants: 332,631. Economy: tradi­tio­nal industries include electro­nics, electrical enginee­ring (electric engines, digital telephone exchanges, software), timber, construc­tion work, chemicals, petro-chemicals, mechanical enginee­ring (indus­trial robots, agricul­tu­ral machinery and equipment for the foodstuffs industry), textiles, leather goods, trade and commerce and also the services sector. Branches of well-known car manufac­tur­ers such as Mercedes Benz, Renault, Daewoo and Ford and also of large inter­na­tio­nal concerns like Coca-Cola, Conti­nen­tal or Alcatel. Science and Education: seven higher education insti­tu­ti­ons with over 20,000 students, the University of Agricul­tu­ral Science, the West University (law, language and literature, journa­lism), polytech­nic. Sport and Leisure Activities: one large and two small football stadiums, ten swimming pools. Culture: National Theatre, the Romanian Opera, German National Theatre, Hungarian National Theatre, puppet theatre, the "Banatul" National Philhar­mo­nic Orchestra, museums and art galleries. Transport Facilities: the Temeswar Inter­na­tio­nal Airport (7,800 flights per annum) offering the city connec­ti­ons to New York, Chicago, Amsterdam, London, Frankfurt, Zurich, Copenhagen, Moscow, Tokyo, Tehran, Vienna and Budapest. The district of Timis has one of the most extensive railway networks throug­hout Romania. Shipping has recom­menced on the Bega Canal, inland port.

 

Weitere Partnerstädte von Temeswar

Faenza Italien, seit 1991
Gera Deutsch­land, seit 1998
Mühlhausen Frankreich, seit 1991
Rueil-Malmaison Frankreich, seit 1993
Szeged Ungarn, seit 1998
Treviso Italien, seit 2003
Palermo Italien, seit 2005
Novi SadSerbien, seit 2005
Graz Österreich, seit 1987
Nottinham Großbri­tan­nien, seit 2008